Linux: Mount a filesystem onto linux

Check your file system

root@bt:~# fdisk -l

Disk /dev/sda: 500.1 GB, 500107862016 bytes
255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 60801 cylinders
Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
Disk identifier: 0xd9dce570

   Device Boot      Start         End      Blocks   Id  System
/dev/sda1   *           1          13      102400    7  HPFS/NTFS
Partition 1 does not end on cylinder boundary.
/dev/sda2              13       34999   281018368    7  HPFS/NTFS
/dev/sda3           34999       57982   184616961    f  W95 Ext'd (LBA)
/dev/sda4           57982       60802    22644736   27  Unknown
/dev/sda5           34999       55316   163202954    7  HPFS/NTFS
/dev/sda6           55317       57827    20169576   83  Linux
/dev/sda7           57828       57982     1244160   82  Linux swap / Solaris

Suppose I want to mount /dev/sda5 upon every start up.

root@bt:~# nano /etc/fstab 
# /etc/fstab: static file system information.
#
# Use 'blkid -o value -s UUID' to print the universally unique identifier
# for a device; this may be used with UUID= as a more robust way to name
# devices that works even if disks are added and removed. See fstab(5).
#
# <file system> <mount point>   <type>  <options>       <dump>  <pass>
proc            /proc           proc    nodev,noexec,nosuid 0       0
# / was on /dev/sda6 during installation
UUID=8b589d8d-01c5-47ef-a4a9-08b8e060bfff /               ext4    errors=remount-ro 0       1
# swap was on /dev/sda7 during installation
UUID=7c2cc509-4b1b-4aa9-9146-e8c98802a946 none            swap    sw              0       0
/dev/sda5 /mnt/windows ntfs noexec,nosuid 0 0

Explanation:

First column is filesystem which is /dev/sda5

Second column is mount point which is /mnt/windows

Third column is type which is NTFS

Fourth column is option which are noexec and nosuid.

noexec = no execution.

nosuid = no superuser.

nodev = no device mounting.

Save the fstab file.

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